Category Archives: Labor Studies

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Calling All Applicants: 2019 Diversity Scholarship

Are You Ready to Make a Difference?

Apply Today!

Application Deadline is: March 19th, 2019.

If you’re seeking to make a difference, advocating for equity within the community, workplace, or the world, then the Joseph S. Murphy Scholarship for Diversity in Labor will help you achieve those goals.

Awardees will receive:
• Up to $30,000 awarded over two years for graduate study
• Up to $20,000 awarded over two years for undergraduate study

Eligibility Requirements

  • For graduate scholarship: First-time entering students in the MA in Labor Studies degree program with a minimum 3.0 GPA
  • For undergraduate scholarship: First-time entering students or continuing students in the BA in Urban and Community Studies degree program, with a concentration in Labor Studies and a minimum 2.5 GPA
  • Scholarship awards will be based on a national competition and are designed to create pipelines that will bring women and people of color to the forefront of the labor movement. Specifically, the Joseph S. Murphy Scholarship for Diversity in Labor is dedicated to the purpose of fostering new, diverse, and representative leadership in the labor movement and in the academic discipline of Labor Studies. To that end, applicants must be part of an underrepresented minority in the field of labor who have demonstrated a commitment to increase the participation of women and people of color in the field of labor.

Deadline Date for submitting the MA in Labor Studies or the BA in Urban and Community Studies
Admissions Application
In order to be eligible for a 2019 Joseph S. Murphy Scholarship for Diversity in Labor, new applicants for admission to either the MA in Labor Studies or the BA in Urban and Community Studies must have their complete admissions application submitted no later than February 19, 2019. In order to be considered for admissions, accompanying required letters of recommendation must be received no later than February 19, 2019 at 11:59 pm.

Scholarships and College Financial Aid
If awarded a scholarship, applicants must complete a 2019-2020 FAFSA form to determine the impact this scholarship opportunity may have on any other financial aid they may be applying for or receiving. Additional guidance for completing the FAFSA form will be provided to awardees by the CUNY SLU Financial Aid office.

Award Notification and Application
Awardees will be notified no later than April 15, 2019. All awards are for the 2019-2020 academic year and the first term award will be applied to each recipient’s incumbent balance in September 2019.

For eligibility information and to apply, please click here or call /email Janet Leslie at 212-642-2083.

Application deadline is March 19th, 2019.

Joseph S. Murphy Institute Scholarship for Diversity in Labor (Deadline: 2/19/19)

The period is now open to file an application for the Joseph S. Murphy Institute Scholarship for Diversity in Labor for Fall 2019 admission. Well qualified candidates should be encouraged to apply. The two-year Scholarship offers students enrolled on the graduate track up to $30,000 and, those enrolled on the undergraduate track up to $20,000.

Eligibility:

Applying for the Diversity Scholarship is a two-step process. The first step is to apply and be accepted to an academic program by the deadline date indicated below. Graduate candidates must be first-time applicants, accepted to the MA in Labor Studies program (MALS). Contact Rob Callaghan at Rob.Callaghan@slu.cuny.edu At the baccalaureate level, candidates must be accepted to, or currently enrolled in the Urban and Community Studies program. Contact Cherise Mullings at Cherise.Mullings@slu.cuny.edu

Continue reading Joseph S. Murphy Institute Scholarship for Diversity in Labor (Deadline: 2/19/19)

On Equity in Our Workforce

By Rebecca Lurie

As I read the latest paper by Steve Dawson on workforce, once again I am grateful for the principles and practices he describes so well. (And succinctly! So if you have time to read a one-pager, do it! And don’t bother to read my post!)

Dawson’s paper, “Class Dismissed Defining Equity in our Workforce Field” suggests we look deeper into meaningful work and consider, when we train and prepare for jobs, that we also train and prepare for the broader world of work. Exposing trainees to organizing, policy, advocacy and cooperative business skills all as means to improve lives even when job placement options are not great.

The full series can be found here. I highly recommend it for those aiming to do more than good work through workforce development, but for those who want to use the opportunity when engaged in workforce training to help raise the bar, and advocate for better jobs and better work in a world that demands us to make ready ourselves, our young, our disenfranchised, for work that will improve conditions through a wide range of strategies and approaches.

Video: The Next Generation: Young Workers Building Movements

On December 6th, members of SLU community gathered to discuss the challenges and opportunities faced by young adults in building the labor movement.

Despite the recent weakness of the U.S. labor movement, young workers are invigorating unions and other working-class organizations throughout the country, showing the promise of a new broad-based progressive movement. Social media-driven movements like #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter, along with the emergence of left political organizations and young candidates for local and national office, have also played an important role in sparking new organizing among younger workers. At the same time, student debt is skyrocketing, permanent full-time jobs are harder to find, unemployment and underemployment are prevalent among low-income young people and communities of color, and increases in housing/living costs far surpass increases in real wages for many young workers.

How are young adults building the labor movement in the face of worsening conditions? How are young workers in other movements influencing the political landscape? Are there fundamental differences in young workers’ outlook or analysis compared to previous generations? What are the primary challenges and obstacles they face given the changing economy and its more precarious job opportunities? What are the most exciting opportunities and partnerships that are being developed by young workers?

The conversation featured Arsenia Reilly-Collins, Jedidiah Labinjo, and Kim Kelly, and was moderated by Diana Robinson.

Check out the video above or here.

Event: The Next Generation: Young Workers Building Movements (12/6)

Thursday, December 6th, 2018
6pm – 8pm ET
CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies
25 W. 43rd Street, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10036

RSVP HERE

Despite the recent weakness of the U.S. labor movement, young workers are invigorating unions and other working-class organizations throughout the country, showing the promise of a new broad-based progressive movement. Social media-driven movements like #MeToo and #BlackLivesMatter, along with the emergence of left political organizations and young candidates for local and national office, have also played an important role in sparking new organizing among younger workers. At the same time, student debt is skyrocketing, permanent full-time jobs are harder to find, unemployment and underemployment are prevalent among low-income young people and communities of color, and increases in housing/living costs far surpass increases in real wages for many young workers. Continue reading Event: The Next Generation: Young Workers Building Movements (12/6)

What’s the Deal with Tariffs?

When the president starts talking trade protectionism, it can be hard to know how to evaluate his rhetoric. SLU professor Stephanie Luce untangled some of the history and policy particulars of the thorny subject of tariffs for Organizing Upgrade:

Donald Trump voiced the real concerns of many Americans when he spoke of the need to bring jobs to communities and to end unfair trade deals. By blocking the Trans-Pacific Partnership, pushing a re-negotiation of NAFTA, and increasing tariffs on a range of imports, Trump has appeared to finally take seriously the needs of unemployed and underemployed workers. Some unions have been calling for tariffs for years, most notably the United Steelworkers. While Obama ran in 2008 on a promise to renegotiate NAFTA he never did so, and in fact became a relentless proponent of expanding “free trade.” Meanwhile, the Trump administration recently announced details of the draft deal with Mexico, and it appears to contain benefits for U.S. and Mexican workers.

So is Trump the worker’s hero? Will increased tariffs return jobs to the US? The left has been weak on this issue. On the one hand, we need to take economic development and job creation seriously. Workers are suffering. Even though official unemployment rates are low, more and more of the jobs people hold are low-wage, insecure, non-union, and dead-end. The left lacks a real program to address the real concerns of those impacted by trade deals. We need to better understand the history of tariffs and trade, and we need an international vision for economic development.

Read the article here.

Photo by M Cheung via flickr (cc)