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Event: The Fight for Fair Elections: Expanding the Vote in 2020 (2/21)

Date: Fri, February 21, 2020
Time: 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM EST
Location: CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, 25 West 43rd Street, 18th Floor, New York, NY 10036

RSVP HERE

Featuring:

  • Gloria Browne-Marshall
    Professor of Constitutional Law, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
  • Gerry Hudson
    Secretary-Treasurer, Service Employees International Union (SEIU)

Moderator:

  • Deepak Bhargava
    Distinguished Lecturer, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies
    Former Executive Director, Center for Community Change

Doors open at 8:30am. A light breakfast will be served.

Given the especially high stakes of the 2020 election, the need for broad and unobstructed voter participation could not be greater. Yet the past decade has seen a plethora of legal curtailments on voting rights. Since 2010, 25 states have adopted strict photo ID requirements, curbs on early voting, and voter registration restrictions that have all served to gut the 1965 Voting Rights Act, a major win of the Civil Rights movement. Finally, the perennial challenge of voter turnout still exists – over 25% of eligible voters are unregistered, and only 50% of registered voters are expected to vote, making the prospects for a truly democratic election in 2020 very concerning.

What lessons can be gleaned from a long history of heroic efforts to ensure equal voting opportunities and rights for all? What are advocates, unions, and other activists doing to combat voter suppression and promote voter registration and turnout in the upcoming election? What should be the top legislative priorities of a more progressive, post-2020 federal government to strengthen our democracy by expanding the vote?

Joseph S. Murphy Scholarship for Diversity in Labor

We are currently recruiting applicants for the Joseph S. Murphy Scholarship for Diversity in Labor , designed to bring woman and people of color to leadership roles in the labor movement and in the filed of Labor Studies. Scholarship recipients will receive full tuition for the M.A. in Labor Studies or B.A. in Urban and Community Studies (Labor concentration) programs.

Strong candidates:
  • Are passionate about labor rights and social change
  • Have a strong academic background
  • Possess leadership skills or leadership potential
  • Will complete Part I of the application by March 3, 2020

What Students Learn

Students in the M.A. in Labor Studies program develop critical thinking, analytical, and leadership skills, while learning: labor law, history, practical skills, and contemporary challenges facing labor. The program is designed to support working adults or full-time students. The B.A. in Urban and Community Studies (labor concentration) curriculum examines policies and governance processes that affect diverse urban working-class communities. B.A. applicants must have completed 60 college credits.

Please share this flyer with your networks.

Deadlines:

Applicants must first apply to the M.A. in Labor Studies or the B.A. in Urban and Community Studies program by March 3, 2020. Contact Laurie.Kellogg@slu.cuny.edu or 718-440-1550 (day, evening or weekend) for information and tips on writing a successful application.
Diversity Scholarship applications must be received by March 24, 2020.

For more information:

Call us at (646) 313-8514
Visit us at slu.cuny.edu

Andres Puerta Talks Organizing on Museum Confidential

In New York and California, museums are getting unionized. And if organizers have anything to say about it, this is a trend that’s going to spread. Last month, SLU alum and IUOE Local 30 Director of Special Projects Andres Puerta went on Museum Confidential to discuss the recent wave — and where we might go from here. Check it out.

Photo by Dave Nakayama via flickr (cc-by)

New Labor Forum Highlights: January 2020

The New Labor Forum has a monthly newsletter on current topics in labor, curated by the some of the most insightful scholars and activists in the labor world today. Check out some highlights from the latest edition below.

With this newsletter we offer advance reading of a feature article from the January 2020 issue of New Labor Forum. In it, Harold Meyerson examines the forces that have made California, once a bastion of conservatism, now the bluest state in the union. Cautioning against the facile formulation that demography is destiny, Meyerson suggests demographic trends don’t adequately explain California’s leftward shift. He tells the story of the emergence of a savvy and determined Latinx-labor coalition that transformed the political landscape, enabling the passage of a slew of recent groundbreaking legislation protecting workers, immigrants, and the environment. We provide a summary of that legislation here . We also include an article from City & State New York , discussing the New York State legislature’s yet unsuccessful efforts to keep pace with west coast counterparts by enabling the reclassification of whole groups of gig workers as employees.

Finally, if one person can be credited as the architect of California’s political transformation, Meyerson suggests it was the former Miguel Contreras, son of immigrant farmworkers from Mexico, who in 1996 became the executive secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor. Back in 2002, at the apex of his leadership, New Labor Forum ran an interview by Kent Wong and Ruth Milkman with Miguel Contreras, in which he describes the disarray within organized labor he confronted early on at the fed, and the strategic organizing undertaken that would later lead to a series of remarkable victories for labor, immigrant, and working-class communities. We include that interview here.

Table of Contents
  1. The “Blue-ing” of California / Harold Meyerson, New Labor Forum
  2. Here Are The 2019 Bills California Has Passed So Far — Now It’s Up To Newsom / CalMatters, LAList
  3. Is there any hope for gig workers this session? / Annie McDonough, City & State New York
  4. Interview with Miguel Contreras / Ruth Milkman and Kent Wong, New Labor Forum

Featured photo by Doug Kerr via flickr (cc-by-sa)

Video: Beyond Resistance: A Progressive Immigration Agenda for 2020

On December 3rd, SLU held an evening forum entitled “Beyond Resistance: A Progressive Immigration Agenda for 2020,” as part of its ongoing #Election2020 program series.

Distinguished Professor Ruth Milkman moderated a panel discussion featuring Maribel Hernández Rivera, District Director for Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez; Muzaffar Chishti, director of the Migration Policy Institute at NYU Law; and SLU Distinguished Lecturer Deepak Bhargava, who was the longtime President and Executive Director of the Center for Community Change and Community Change Action. The forum was co-sponsored by the New York Immigration Coalition.

Hernández Rivera discussed the potential of migrants’ stories to shift public dialogue and educate more Americans about the crises immigrants face and the contributions they make. Chishti provided insider critiques of recent immigration policy failures and a balanced outlook about the specific proposals a new Democratic administration should prioritize. Bhargava spoke about the intersections between U.S. foreign policy and immigration policy, as well as how racism shapes public opinion and policy-making.

Missed the event or want to review the conversation? Check out the video above.

A conversation about workers, communities and social justice

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