Tag Archives: economic democracy

css.php

Event: Putting Democracy to Work: How Women Lead Worker Cooperatives (7/24)

Wednesday, July 24, 2019: 6:30-8:00 PM
CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies
25 W. 43rd Street, Room 18A-B
New York, NY 10036

Featuring:

  • Adria Powell, CEO and President, Cooperative Home Care Associates
  • Maru Bautista, Director of the Cooperative Development Project, Center of Family Life
  • Rebecca Lurie, CUNY SLU Professor, Moderator

Join us for a presentation in connection with the SLU summer course “Theory, Practice and Principles of Cooperative Enterprise Management.” Over the past eight weeks, 25 SLU students engaged in learning and experiencing cooperative management techniques and approaches for bringing the change we want to see in the world.

This special final session will feature guest speakers from two of the largest organizations involved in worker co-ops in New York City. Adria Powell, CEO and President of Cooperative Home Care Associates in the Bronx, represents the cooperative with more than 2,000 workers who are members of 1199SEIU-United Healthcare Workers East. Maru Bautista, Director of the Cooperative Development Project at the Center for Family Life in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, serves the immigrant communities with start-up support and sector-based cooperative economic development. Both women serve on the board of Democracy At Work Institute (DAWI), and both are members of the U.S. Federation of Worker Cooperatives. SLU Professor Rebecca Lurie will host the conversation and moderate a discussion with the audience.

No RSVP necessary. Doors open at 6 PM. Light refreshments will be served.

Economic Democracy on Laura Flanders Show

Last month, SLU hosted Our Economy!, a conference where leaders in community, labor and the economic democracy movement gathered to vision for an economy that can work for everyone. The most recent episode of the Laura Flanders Show covers some of the conversations that took place at the conference, and which have been happening in SLU’s Community and Worker Ownership Project and beyond. Check it out here:

via Laura Flanders Show:

Our city’s economy – what is it for? New York’s has been very good at piling up profits and building tall buildings. But all that private profit has come at a cost to public services and public trust. Could it be different? On this week’s show, we talk about the new conversations that are happening between labor unions and community members. Between residents, workers, and employers about how everyone’s economy can move forward. 

Updates from the Community and Worker Ownership Project

April was a very exciting month for the Community and Worker Ownership Project at SLU. We hosted the new school’s first faculty conference; “Our Economy! Economic Democracy and System Change,” giving us the opportunity to gather several hundred people to have shared conversations about what would it take to take to scale practice for economic democracy. What policies should we be promoting? What should we be teaching? How are we doing it?

Later in the month, CWOP coordinator Rebecca Lurie visited Wellspring Cooperatives, a cooperative development organization in Springfield, Massachusetts that works closely with organized labor and U. Mass at Amherst. While there, Rebecca spoke at the Pioneer Valley Central Labor Council and the Western Mass Affiliate Labor Federation as part of their Annual Training Conference and Workers Memorial Day Ceremony. She talked about unions and coops and where they overlap with vision and mission for worker dignity, offering expanded approaches with the notion of worker and community ownership and control. Continue reading Updates from the Community and Worker Ownership Project

Notes on Our Economy

After last month’s economic democracy conference at SLU, new ideas and conversations are bubbling up in New York City and beyond. How can we implement some of our best ideas about democratizing our workplaces and our economy?

One attendee, Evelyn Wright of Commonwealth Hudson Valley, wrote a blog post outlining her work and ideas and summarizing some of the conversations that the day generated

Last Friday I went into the city for a daylong conference on Economic Democracy and System Change at CUNY’s School of Labor and Urban Studies. Deputy Mayor Philip Thompson opened the day with a talk about why we need economic democracy, how economic democracy differs from the socialism and social democracy of the twentieth century, and what the city is doing to promote it. Continue reading Notes on Our Economy

Video: Our Economy Conference

By all accounts, “Our Economy!”—the first-ever faculty conference of the CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies—was an overwhelming success! More than 300 individuals attended, representing over 100 institutions and organizations. That number included dozens of SLU staff, faculty, and students. More than 50 speakers and presenters participated on 18 panels. And … an additional 500+ people viewed the livestream event on Facebook! Many connections and relationships created, fostered or were strengthened by this collaborative event.

Hungry for more Economic Democracy? Visit the OUR ECONOMY Dropbox to access papers and Powerpoint presentations submitted by conference speakers. Also, visit the Youtube channel of the CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies to view slideshows and videos from the conference.

And in case you missed the amazing closing performance by the “Resistance Revival Chorus?” or just want to relive the magic, check it out here!

New Labor Forum: April 15th, 2019

The New Labor Forum has a bi-weekly newsletter on current topics in labor, curated by the some of the most insightful scholars and activists in the labor world today. Check out some highlights from the latest edition below. 

The gaping income and wealth inequality, increasing constrictions on democratic rights, and perilous ecological unsustainability that are the features of the contemporary U.S. political economy have given rise to a host of theoretical and practical efforts to imagine another way. These efforts were the focus of an important national conference “Our Economy! Economic Democracy and System Change” held on April 12th at the CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies, publisher of New Labor Forum. How can we transform our economy into a more just and ecologically sustainable system? What current practices and historic precedents offer lessons toward the creation of a participatory democracy? This newsletter provides a video clip of a rousing speech by conference keynote, J. Phillip Thompson, NYC Deputy Mayor for Strategic Policy Initiatives. In his remarks, Thompson discusses the legacy of organized labor’s tragic failure to build a multi-racial working-class movement for economic democracy. On this theme, we also include a New Labor Forumarticle by Brandon Terry and Jason Lee, who examine current tendencies among the leadership of black social justice organizations and unions that hinder the possibility for this sort of broader movement. We end with a poem by Pulitzer Prize winning poet, Gregory Pardlo, who writes with poignant grace of his childhood as the son of an African American union leader in the cataclysmic PATCO strike of 1981.

Table of Contents

  1. The Origins and Relevance of the Struggle for Economic Democracy in the U.S./ J. Phillip Thompson, CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies
  2. Rethinking the Problem of Alliance: Organized Labor and Black Political Life/ Brandon M. Terry and Jason Lee, New Labor Forum
  3. Winter After the Strike/ Gregory Pardlo, Digest

Photo by Neil Hinchley via flickr (cc-nc-nd)